The Unbecoming of Mara Dyer by Michelle Hodkin

My last read of 2014 and it knocked it outta the park!

5 out of 5 stars – easily.

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This is a Young Adult story about Mara Dyer in the aftermath of a tragedy where she is the surviver of a building collapse where three of her friends die, which include her best friend and boyfriend.

Mara’s mind is unraveling as she takes up in a new town and new school with her family.  To see more of my review, click here:

GoodReads Review

My favorite quotes from the story:

“Fix me,” I commanded him. “This thing, what I’ve done – there’s something wrong with me, Noah. Fix it.” Noah’s expression broke my heart as he brushed my hair from my face, and skimmed the line of my neck. “I can’t”

“Why not?” I asked, my voice threatening to crack.

“Because,” he said, “You’re not broken.”  ― Michelle Hodkin, The Unbecoming of Mara Dyer

*    *    *

“Did I just see you litter?’
‘I’m driving a hybrid. It cancels out.” ― Michelle Hodkin, The Unbecoming of Mara Dyer

*    *    *

“Asscrown,” I muttered under my breath as I headed to my next class. I wasn’t proud of swearing at a complete stranger, no. but he started it.

Noah matched my pace. “Don’t you mean ‘assclown’?” He looked amused.

“No,” I said, louder this time. “I mean asscrown. The crown on top of the asshat that covers the asshole of the assclown. The very zenith in the hierarchy of asses,” I said, as though I was reading from a dictionary of modern profanity.

“I guess you nailed me then.” ― Michelle Hodkin, The Unbecoming of Mara Dyer

*     *     *

Have you read this story, what did you think? Would love to hear from you.  If not, certainly put it on your list to read soon.

Did you like this post, if so let me know by liking and/or sharing below.

FF#29 Armageddon and Unprepared

Armageddon

Weather

Angry and Mad

Rips through Concrete Landscapes

Floods away Remains of Yesterday

Displaced

*     *     *

Unprepared

Trapped

Disaster Affronts

Closing Off Doors

Howling Wind, Rain, Darkness

Isolated

*     *     *

Winner stampThese cinquain poems were inspired from Featured Fiction’s #29 Disaster Thriller prompt. Challenge accepted for cinquain poem and featured theme: “The world is plagued by a series of strange weather phenomena. You find yourself trapped in a city, completely unprepared and cut off from the rest of civilization.”

Armageddon is in syllable pattern (2,4,6,8,2) and Unprepared is in word cinquain pattern.

Check out other entries and vote (click on link this weekend) it’s always great fun.

If you liked/loved my poems let me know, by liking, sharing or commenting below. Also any tips for improvement always welcomed, we should learn something new everyday.

All creative rights reserved by author.

Want to learn how to write a cinquain poem?

I did, and this is what I found out! The cinquain (pronounced ‘sin-cane’ not ‘sin-kwane’) or also known as the quintain or quintet; is a poem or stanza composed of 5 lines.  The cinquain poetry is similar to haiku in that the rules for writing them are based on syllables.

Cinquain syllables in the following pattern:

Line 1 – 2 syllables

Line 2 – 4 syllables

Line 3 – 6 syllables

Line 4 – 8 syllables

Line 5 – 2 syllables

An alternative version of the cinquain poem, often called a ‘word cinquain’ is based on words, instead of syllables.

Word cinquain is in the following pattern:

Line 1 – 1 word

Line 2 – 2 words

Line 3 – 3 words

Line 4  – 4 words

Line 5 – 1 word

There are various opinions on what makes a good cinquain poem.  Some feel it’s best to organize to tell a story and admittedly I enjoy these kind due to the mental construction it leaves behind for the reader.  However, poetic devices such as assonance and alliteration can be used to help make cinquain poems memorable.  It’s purely up to your creative juices as there is no real wrong way to go about poetry.

Cinquain sample common story telling pattern:

Line 1 – Subject

Line 2 – Description

Line 3 – Action

Line 4 – Feeling

Line 5 – Conclusion